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Carved in black and white

Carved anchor chain on a headstone, Waverley Cemetery.

Carved anchor chain on a headstone, Waverley Cemetery.

This could be a first for me: not only two posts in one day, but two collections of photographs taken during the same shoot. I was excited to see that Cee’s Black & White Photo Challenge this week has the theme of Sculptures, Statues, Carvings. On a beautiful Sydney winter day (flawless blue sky, 15 degrees C) I headed off to Waverley Cemetery, which I know has a great collection of wonderfully weathered stone subjects. While sitting on a bench I realised I was staring at a vault door, and I remembered that the Weekly Photo Challenge is doors. (Click here to see the vault door post.)

Anyway, back to the Sculptures, Statues and Carvings …

The next photo was taken on a previous visit, but fits in well with this theme. I love the way the wings and the drapery seem to become one at the bottom. It’s the statue I described looking for in the post “In search of an angel“.

Angel and boy.

Angel and boy.

I have posted other photographs about this cemetery:

Doors to eternal rest

These doors are from a few of the many family vaults in Waverley Cemetery, in Sydney’s Eastern Suburbs. I was intrigued by the variety of styles, materials and adornments.

I have posted other photographs about this cemetery:

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Monochrome Kiwifruit

Kiwifruit slice backlit

Kiwifruit slice backlit (with some HDR toning to liven it up)

Monochrome Madness* this week is about things beginning with K. I went for kiwifruit. The slices were quite beautiful and rather alien-looking when photographed with a strong light behind them.

Kiwifruit slice backlit

Kiwifruit slice backlit (this one reminds me of a jellyfish)

Kiwifruit slice backlit

Kiwifruit slice backlit

Kiwifruit slices

Kiwifruit slices

By the time I was finished photographing, the poor kiwifruit was looking a bit the worse for wear. But it was juicy and smelled very inviting, so I couldn’t bring myself to throw it out. This is not the first time I’ve had to, uh, dispose of consumable photo props:

*I see that the photo (the first one above) that I sent for inclusion in Monochrome Madness was not included in the MM post.

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Let there be light(s)

House light - New Orleans

House light – New Orleans

It would be an exaggeration to describe lamps and lights along streets, houses and parks as my “muse“, but I do seem to take a lot of photos of them! I’m drawn to their shapes (which can be sinuous or angular), their symmetry in rows or clusters, and of course the way the light plays on them.

(click any image to view full size)

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Ice ice baby

A "log pile" of slowly melting ice.A "log pile" of slowly melting ice.

A “log pile” of slowly melting ice.

I took these photos for Leanne Cole’s 3 June Monochrome Madness with the theme of water. I intended to post them then, but I was on holiday at the time and I forgot. I was reminded of them when I saw this week’s Monochrome Madness post. Oh well, better late than never!

(Leanne’s next theme is “things beginning with K” — I’m working on kiwifuit, or maybe kalamata olives; check back next week to find out which.)

A "log pile" of slowly melting ice.

A “log pile” of slowly melting ice.

A "log pile" of slowly melting ice.

A “log pile” of slowly melting ice.

(Apologies to Vanilla Ice for nicking the name of his song for my post’s title. I’m certainly not a hip hop fan, but I do like “Under Pressure” by Queen and David Bowie, which features in “Ice ice baby”.)

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A walk in Riverside Park, Manhattan

69th Street Transfer Bridge

69th Street Transfer Bridge

Riverside Park runs for 4 miles (6.4 km) on the west side of Manhattan, from 72nd to 158th Streets. Since 1875, it’s offered somewhere for New Yorkers to escape the city and relax. Part of the land on which the park is built was originally used for railroads.

The photo above is what’s left of the 69th Street Transfer Bridge — a dock for car floats which allowed the transfer of railroad cars from the rail line to car floats that crossed the Hudson River to New Jersey. It may seem an odd subject to open a post about a park, but it looms over the park and is a reminder of the area’s history. The bridge was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 2003.

Hover mouse over image for caption; click to open gallery and view full size.

The park is a great spot for chilling out.

Reminders of the area’s industrial history are everywhere.

This aerial shot shows the 69th Street Transfer Bridge and the rebuilt Pier 1 beside it, plus the rotting remains of old structures.

This aerial shot shows the 69th Street Transfer Bridge and the rebuilt Pier 1 beside it, plus the rotting remains of old structures.

The park looks across the Hudson River to New Jersey.

A dramatic sky breaks over the New Jersey shoreline.

A dramatic sky breaks over the New Jersey shoreline.

In the 1980s Donald Trump owned the 57 acres of land just south of Riverside Park that had been the Penn Central freight rail yard. His Riverside South development of towering apartment buildings also extended the park south to 59th Street.

If you enjoyed this walk along part of Manhattan’s Riverside Park, head over to Jo’s Monday Walk to see where other people have been walking.


Facts and figures about Riverside Park taken from:
nycgovparks.org/parks/riverside-park/history
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Riverside_Park_(Manhattan)
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/New_York_Central_Railroad_69th_Street_Transfer_Bridge