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Trains and Tracks

Pine Creek Railway Museum, Northern Territory, Australia

Pine Creek Railway Museum

Disused tracks, Pine Creek Railway Museum. You can make out the name “H Pooley & Son, Liverpool, London”

I have two sets of railway-related photos for Cee’s Fun Foto Challenge with this week’s theme of trains and tracks. The first is from Pine Creek in northern Australia, where enthusiasts and volunteers maintain a small museum dedicated to the area’s railway history.

Locomotive at Pine Creek Railway Museum

Locomotive at Pine Creek Railway Museum

The narrow-gauge North Australia Railway ran south from Darwin and reached Pine Creek in 1888. By 1929 it had reached its farthest point, Birdum, a distance of some 509 km (316 miles). The line’s busiest period was during World War II.

The locomotive was built in 1877 in England, and rebuilt in 2001 in Australia.

This locomotive was built in 1877 in England, and rebuilt in 2001 in Australia.

The line closed on 30 June 1976, overshadowed by more effective means of transport, but in its time was important carrier of goods and people.

Luxurious travel in its day, but uncomfortable by our standards!

Luxurious travel in its day, but uncomfortable by our standards!

The Grand Canyon Railway, Arizona, US

The Grand Canyon Railway

The Grand Canyon Railway

The first train to carry passengers the 103 km (64 miles) from Williams, Arizona to the south rim of the Grand Canyon ran on 17 September 1901.

Old locomotive, Grand Canyon Railway

Old steam locomotive, Grand Canyon Railway

As with the North Australia Railway, competition from cars led to closure of the Grand Canyon Railway in July 1968 (only three passengers were on the last run!). Three unsuccessful attempts were made to resurrect the line, until in 1989 services resumed under different ownership.

Current locomotive, Grand Canyon Railway

Current diesel locomotive, Grand Canyon Railway. It may be more efficient and more environmentally friendly, but it doesn’t captivate people like the steam locos do!

The train today offers seating in various classes, from all-inclusive food and drink luxury carriages to high-domed viewing carriages to straightforward seating.

Going around a corner, shot from the platform at the end of the train

Going around a corner, shot from the platform at the end of the train

At the end of the train is an open platform that offers uninterrupted views back at the tracks, or forward if you lean around the corner of the carriage.

Looking back at the tracks from the platform.

Looking back at the tracks from the platform.

I think you can guess which class of seat I opted for.😉

Access to the rear platform is through this door.

Access to the rear platform is through this door.

Time to relax, enjoy the scenery and decide which beverage to have.

Time to relax, enjoy the scenery and decide which beverage to have.

(Information about these reailways was taken from Wikipedia)


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Fish
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Random Fridays: Fish

Schools of fish 'swim' among crystal curtains.

Schools of fish ‘swim’ among crystal curtains.

A hotel in Brisbane has given guests in rooms with windows that face a dark inner courtyard something to look at besides the windows of the rooms opposite. It was quite hypnotic to watch the slight, languorous movement of the fish in unseen drafts, and the wink of colour from the crystals.


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The Hand Slap Game

Hand Slap on the beach, Fiji

Hand Slap on the beach, Fiji

I took this photo on my recent Fiji sailing holiday. We had visited the remote village of Daliconi on the island of Vanua Baluva, and were sitting around on the beach waiting for the boats to take us back to the ship. One of my shipmates introduced some of the children to the Hand Slap Game (also apparently known as red hands, slapsies, slap jack, red tomato or slaps). I wanted to capture the contrasts in their hands — large and small, white and brown, be-ringed and plain, clean and sandy.

A Photo a Week Challenge: Hands


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Stone fountain, Hyde Park, Sydney
Blue trees
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Random Fridays: Blue Trees

Trees painted blue, Pyrmont (Sydney)

Trees painted blue, Pyrmont (Sydney)

Blue trees. Okay, something about that is just wrong. Wrong … but certainly eye catching!

Seriously, though: ‘The Blue Trees’ is an environmental art installation that draws attention to global deforestation by turning living, breathing trees bright blue, demanding we notice them before the planet’s old forests are gone for good. Artist Konstantin Dimopoulos uses a biologically safe, water based colourant. [from the blurb beside the trees]

Blue tree, orange umbrella.

Blue tree, orange umbrella.


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sunset from Tenacious
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Sailing around Fiji

I spent two weeks in June on the tall ship Tenacious sailing around some of the islands that make up Fiji. You’ll no doubt see a few photos on this blog as time goes on (!), but here’s a video I made that sums up the voyage. If the embedded video doesn’t work or you’d prefer the larger version, you can view it directly on youtube.


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