Reflections 2: Pools, puddles and other bodies of water

This is my second post on the subject of Reflections, this time restricted to reflections in water. The first three are from Auckland, New Zealand, a place with a lot of water throwing back interesting images.

Maritime Museum, Auckland.

Maritime Museum, Auckland.

'Lord Nelson' and a puddle on the quayside, Auckland.

‘Lord Nelson’ and a puddle on the quayside, Auckland.

This image in a pool outside the Auckland Art Gallery reminds me of a watercolour painting.

This image in a pool outside the Auckland Art Gallery reminds me of a watercolour painting.

Palm trees reflected in a very shallow canal, Goa.

Palm trees reflected in a very shallow canal, Goa.

Sillustani, Lake Umayo near Puno in Peru.

Sillustani, Lake Umayo near Puno in Peru.

This puddle in Sydney is like a portal to another world.

This puddle in Sydney is like a portal to another world.

Found in nature

I really enjoyed Cee’s Black & White Challenge this week. It gave me another set of photos on which to practise my nascent RAW file processing, and it prompted me to look at my familiar surroundings with a new eye, wondering what might look good in black and white. These images are of things Found In Nature.

Dried silver fern leaf from New Zealand.

Dried silver fern leaf from New Zealand.

Eroded sandstone cliff face.

Eroded sandstone cliff face.

Dried flower heads.

Dried flower heads.

Sea shells from Texas.

Sea shells from Texas.

A weathered tree trunk.

A weathered tree trunk.

A feather in the grass.

A feather in the grass.

Gallery

In search of an angel

I spent last evening in a cemetery. An odd way to fill two hours after work on a Wednesday, I grant you. But it was a lovely summer evening, and I wanted to find a particular angel memorial. I thought I knew where it was. I was wrong, as it turned out! I didn’t find the memorial, and I ran out of daylight because I kept stopping to take photos. The dramatic sunset was an unexpected photographic bonus.

(click any image in this gallery to see full size)

This is my second post from Waverley Cemetery, here is the first.

sydney-strolls-badge

Not what it seems

But what is it? For Perspective, here are two photos I took of a — thing. The tight crop, narrow perspective and selective focus make these objects interesting, but can you identify them? Hint: if you live and work in a city, you likely stand on one of these every day, albeit not in its dismantled state, as seen here.

Perspective 1

Perspective 1

Perspective 2

Perspective 2

Have you figured out what it is? Click here to see if you’re right.

Getty Giveaway

I discovered something interesting today: Getty, one of the world’s great photo libraries, is making 35 million (yup, million) of its images free to use on blogs and social media.

Don’t get too excited, however. As with embedding a youtube video on a site, you embed the photo with some code; this means you can’t edit it in any way, and Getty adds a photographer credit and link back to its site (as you can see in the photo I’ve used here). That said, there’s nothing to stop you from grabbing the image via a screengrab or Snippet, doing what you like with it, deleting the embed code and then using the edited version of the image.

Nothing, that is, but your own honour and sense of what’s right.

I assume that the people who follow my photo blog are, like me, photographers. People who like to take a photo, to edit it, to make it their own and then (given we’re on WordPress) share it with like-minded people. I, personally, would never consider passing off someone else’s work as my own. Sadly, though, there are people who would.

So I do wonder where Getty is going with this initiative.

There’s no denying that people who like to add an image to a non-photo blog post, something to liven it up and draw the eye, will welcome Getty’s move. On my writing blog, I always use an image on a post: some are photos I’ve taken myself, some are from stock.xchang (a useful, albeit limited, source of free images that generally have no restrictions on their use), and some are photos that I’ve bought from iStock or Shutterstock for work (I’m a digital and print designer in real life) and, um, repurposed. My first experiment in using the newly (legitimately) free Getty images was on my writing blog earlier today: you can see it here.

There’s no doubt that Getty’s giveaway is a remarkable thing. But what’s behind it?

Read more:

Barnstormin’

Over at Sunday Stills, the challenge this week is barns, black and white. There’s a pronounced shortage of barns in my part of Sydney, but Ed has kindly allowed we barn-challenged types to substitute sheds.

This is the closest I could get to a 'barn' in Sydney.

This is the closest I could get to a ‘barn’ in Sydney.

Not one but TWO sheds, spied from my balcony.

Not one but TWO sheds, spied from my balcony.

Abandoned

I played around with my images for the Weekly Photo Challenge: Abandoned. Some duotone here, some film grain there, and the finals look nothing like the original photos.

Abandoned tractor, New Zealand.

Abandoned tractor, New Zealand.

Abandoned boat, New Zealand.

Abandoned boat, New Zealand.

Abandoned boot, Sicily.

Abandoned boot, Sicily.

The originals
Here are the untouched originals, if you’d like to compare them with the finals.
(click any photo in the gallery to expand)