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Guiding-lights

Fremantle, WA, Australia – guiding-light with sun halo behind

I discovered that I have a number of photos of “guiding-lights”, so decided to put them into one post. Guiding-lights are, of course, more commonly known as lighthouses — but having been reminded that the theme is ‘words ending in light’, I’ve had to get creative with some post titles and dip into the thesaurus for synonyms. 😉

Macquarie Lighthouse, Sydney

Galle fort, Sri Lanka

Hornby lighthouse, Sydney

Byron Bay, NSW, Australia

Beachy Head, England

Posted as part of January Squares, the theme for which is words ending in ‘light’.

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A parched walk in the Blue Mountains

Blue sky! That’s not cloud on the horizon, however — it’s bushfire smoke.

In October, I walked a portion of the Prince Henry Cliff Walk from Echo Point to a track junction that leads to Merriwa St in Katoomba. Then, the rain was unceasing and the temperature was about 10deg C (50deg F) (see “A soggy walk in the Blue Mountains“). Since then, bushfires have raged in the Blue Mountains and the entire national park (some 2,690 sq km / 1,040 sq miles) was closed due to fire danger. On 31 December, when I walked again, only one track was open — the Prince Henry Cliff Walk. So I followed it in the reverse direction this time, and from Gordon Falls Lookout in Leura to Echo Point in Katoomba. (Map source)

This easily accessed walk was the only open trail.

I was very lucky with the smoke — the morning was clear, the first blue sky for quite a while, I was told. Not so lucky with the temperature, though: it was 30deg C (85deg F) when I began walking, and 35deg C (95deg F) when I stopped. That’s really not ideal for the ups and downs and sometimes rough terrain of such a walk!

A potion of the trail, very dry.

Even this trail, skirting the towns of Katoomba and Leura, is not safe from fire. Some, inexplicably, are deliberately lit by arsonists.

Recently burned area beside the trail.

Recently burned area beside the trail.

Recently burned area beside the trail.

In this view from a lookout, the burnt areas are clear. Again, that’s smoke on the horizon.

View from Olympian Rock lookout — the orange patches are burnt forest.

Finally, I got to Echo Point. This walk is only about 7km but I deliberately went slowly and rested often. The heat did not make for pleasant walking, and I hadn’t taken enough water so I was feeling about as parched as the forest! The blue sky of my start had, 2.5 hours later, mostly given way to murky, opaque smoke.

Contrast the photo below of visitors at Echo Point with one from October of the same spot.

Admiring the view, Echo Point.

The views from Echo Point are extensive. Sadly, this time the views include spot fires and smoke.

Spot fires visible from Echo Point.

Spot fires visible from Echo Point.

No ice cream or cake at the end of this walk, something more substantial was called for. 😉

An icy cold glass of Tooheys Old beer.

Posted as part of Jo’s Monday Walk.

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Refracted sunlight

“White light entering a prism is bent, or refracted. This separates the light into its constituent wavelengths. Each wavelength of light has a different color based on the angle at which it bends. The colors of white light always emerge through a prism in the same order —- red, orange, yellow, green, blue, indigo, and violet.” (source) That’s such a dry explanation for what happens when sunlight passes through my faceted glass sphere and splashes onto a wall.

Let there be light! Becky’s back with a new month of squares, and the theme is light.