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Hands off!

Like a red flag to a bull …

Is it just me, or does this sign make you want to poke these things?

What did the fellow resident who put these plants in the common walkway beside my apartment building think that people would do?

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Tied up

The grand old lady QE2 tied up in Zeebrugge

Among the many uses for the verb “tie up” I’m going with the nautical interpretation: to tie a boat to something with a rope, chain etc (synonym: moor). (Although I do keep thinking of the title of the 1989 Pedro Almodóvar film “Tie Me Up! Tie Me Down!” — but I have no photos for that!)

Lord Nelson’s mooring lines around a bollard, keeping the ship tied up in Galle, Sri Lanka

This is what happens when a number of ships have tied up together — and one wants to leave (us, in this case). (Galle, Sri Lanka)

Do you think this dockworker in Mauritius is pondering the accomplished way we tied up Lord Nelson?

Queen Mary 2, tied up in Sydney. This is the only cruise ship that ties up here ‘stern first’ so that its bow sticks out into the harbour.

Tenacious, tied up in Sydney (with the hideous “blot on the landscape” towers of Barangaroo behind)

Tenacious tied up in Fiji.

Voyager of the Seas, tied up in Sydney.

Posted for Becky’s SquareUp challenge. I’ve gone with “playing around with the word up”.

As always, a big thanks to Becky for organising all this square madness!


sailing-badge

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Stupa

Swaymbhunath Stupa (also known as ‘Monkey Temple’)

“The stupa (“stupa” is Sanskrit for heap) is an important form of Buddhist architecture… At its simplest, a stupa is a dirt burial mound faced with stone.” (source) The Swaymbhunath Stupa in Kathmandu, Nepal, is far from a simple mound! In the photo above, the textured curved white base is the stupa itself; atop it is the “yasti, or spire, which symbolizes the axis mundi (a line through the earth’s center around which the universe is thought to revolve)”.

You can get a better idea of the scale of the Swaymbhunath Stupa complex in the photo below. For more information on Swaymbhunath Stupa, and a more comprehensive photo, go here.

The complex seen from a distance.

Posted for Becky’s SquareUp challenge. I’ve gone with “playing around with the word up”.

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Two uppers and a scupper

The upper mess on Tenacious is where the permanent crew and the ongoing watch eat. (The ‘lower mess’ is where everyone else eats.)

Time for some nautical ups!

Taken from the platform above the upper topsail on the mainmast of Tenacious, this photo is a view looking forward (and down!). The whiter sail at the top of the photo is the upper topsail on the foremast.

A scupper is an opening in a ship’s side that allows water to run off the deck. In a big sea, when a ship is rolling, it also allows water to run onto the deck!

Tenacious, Atlantic Ocean

Posted for Becky’s SquareUp challenge. I’ve gone with “playing around with the word up”.

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Monarch butterfly pupa

Pupa (also known as chrysalis) tucked away out of danger. You can see the wing markings through the thin pupa.

When my parents wintered in south Texas, they grew butterfly-friendly plants to help the Monarch butterflies, which are in danger in North America. The butterflies would head north from Mexico and lay eggs in my parents’ garden. The eggs would hatch, the caterpillars would gorge themselves, and then they’d crawl off to what they considered to be a safe location (including under lawn chairs!). Then the magic would happen inside the pupa.

“Chrysalis is a Greek word for gold. Scientists are unsure about why the gold band and spots appear on the chrysalis. … After about 10 days, the final moult reveals an adult butterfly. The enlarged abdomen is full of fluid. The butterfly pumps the fluid into its crumpled wings until they become full and stiff.” (source)

How did something so large fit into that small container?

Posted for Becky’s SquareUp challenge. I’ve gone with “playing around with the word up”.