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Let sleeping dragons lie

Sleeping dragon sculpture, Darling Point, Sydney

Sleeping dragon sculpture, Darling Point, Sydney

How cute is this snoozing dragon? 🙂 I came across him (her?) last weekend while exploring my new neighbourhood. My plan was to get the ferry from Darling Point to Double Bay — an absurdly short 5-minute ride, but living on the harbour is a novelty and ferries have always been a treat, so why walk? I was delighted to find this wee dragon curled up beside a pond near the ferry wharf.

But, I was not sure the dragon, which is carved, qualified as a sculpture. All good, though: Subtractive sculpture involve removing material from a large piece to achieve a sculptural form. Woodcarving and stone carving are both examples of subtractive sculpture. (source)

Sleeping dragon sculpture, Darling Point, Sydney

Sleeping dragon sculpture, Darling Point, Sydney

Posted as part of Sculpture Saturday

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The Pathfinder

The Pathfinder by John Robinson

The Pathfinder by John Robinson (aka The Hammer Thrower)

This is absolutely one of my most favourite sculptures. You can find it Queen Victoria Gardens, Melbourne. By John Edward Robinson, it’s a sculpture in bronze and dates to 1974. As you can see in the image above, the entire sculpture is balanced on just one foot, which I think is extraordinary. An incredible display of the understanding of physics and gravity — plus, the sculpture is so alive and so vivid, you expect him to move, to complete that throw. More about the sculpture and the artist here.

The Pathfinder by John Robinson

The Pathfinder by John Robinson (aka The Hammer Thrower)

Posted as part of Sculpture Saturday. Check it out: “This challenge is all about photographing art whether it be in a museum or out on the street. Another interpretation is things be they natural or manmade that resemble sculpture when photographed.”

(And if you’ve wondered about my blogging silence, August has been a busy month for me, as I’ve moved house and had a wretched “lurgy”, so have been rather self-absorbed!)

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Blue bubbly

Would you drink this?

I’m closing off my blue squares with some blue bubbly, topped with some blueberries.

And if you’re wondering whether I actually drank this … well, my fingers were stained blue, the dye (approved and ‘safe’ food dye from the supermarket) had a clingy texture that reminded me of balls of mercury, and you saw what it did in the glass of water. So, no. Though I did eat the blueberries. 🙂

The theme for July Squares is Blue. As ever, thanks are due to our tireless host Becky for organising these squares.

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Piccadilly Line blues

Indicator board at Earl’s Court station, London

I always liked these old-fashioned indicator boards, a relic from the past in our shiny digital age. This one is at Earl’s Court station, but I imagine they hang on in other stations of the London Underground.

I used to get quite ‘blue’ (by which I mean frustrated and peeved!) on the Piccadilly Line trains when I lived in London, but now it’s Sydney trains that receive my ire. And as every Londoner knows, the Piccadilly Line is the blue one! Rather misleadingly, the indicator board above is the same blue as the Piccadilly Line, but those stops are on the District Line, which is green. Confused yet?

Small but relevant section of London’s tube map. Earl’s Court station has been marked with a red box.

The theme for July Squares is Blue