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Washing Lines 4: Fiji

This photo is from the island of Matuku, Fiji, which I visited in 2016 on the tall ship Tenacious. I was struck — as I often am in places where people have so much less than we in prosperous Western countries have — by how clean everyone’s clothes were, and by how much effort the women put into ensuring that.

Monday Washing Lines

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Last on the Card April 2021

Both photos were taken at sunset on 30 April in Ettalong, NSW. Thousands of rainbow lorikeets wheeled and swirled and chased each other in huge flocks above the town as the sun set. If you’ve never heard even one rainbow lorikeet at full voice, you’ll struggle to imagine just how ear-splitting and deafening the birds’ noise was!

Canon Powershot SX260: I use this camera when I can’t be bothered with the weight and bulk of my ‘real’ camera.

Huawei MYA-L02: my phone takes rubbish photos and I generally only use the camera for taking a photo to send to someone at the moment — but I like how here it caught a recognisable parrot shape.

I haven’t entered Bushboy’s Last on the Card challenge before, partly because I generally wipe the card — and partly because I never post unedited photos! But I like the symmetry of these two.

Also linking to Bird Weekly – Birds in Flight

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Washing Lines 3: rubber gloves

I always smile when I see this photo.

What does “Happy Hour” mean to you? Reduced prices on wine and cocktails? Well, on the Jubilee Sailing Trust’s two tall ships, it means the hour spent each day cleaning the ship. You can imagine how many rubber gloves end up wet both inside and out! Here they are after a Happy Hour on Tenacious, Atlantic Ocean, 2004.

Monday Washing Lines

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Washing Lines 2: Nepal

I never found out what the very colourful (mostly vibrant pink!) cloth spread out to dry on the ground was. If you peer into the murk, you may just be able to make out another set of hills; and beyond that, up in the sky, you may, if your imagination runs that way, spot some snow-capped peaks. Due to dust, haze and pollution, March/April 2005 did not offer great views for our trek in the Himalayan foothills.

Monday Washing Lines

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Keeping out the cold

Quite an interesting look, but alas, all the eye sees is a muzzy grey-blue smudge of shapes.

I hate being cold, especially indoors. I lived in Canada until I was 29: yes, winters are below 0degC there, but every house and apartment has central heating, so you’re warm — often too warm — inside. In London, heating in my various rented apartments was dodgy; it would come on at odd hours (when cheapest for the landlord!) and often was wholly inadequate even when on. I remember one especially miserly landlord who loudly insisted an extra sweater would be fine, and forbade electric heaters (I ignored that rule, and moved out asap). And in Australia (Sydney, at least) central heating just doesn’t exist, despite it sometimes getting down to 5degC at night in winter. The combination of plug-in electric heaters (and the associated eye-watering electricity bills) and gappy windows is not a happy one.

We’ve just come out of an unseasonably early winter spell. Nights of 10degC outside — and mornings of 15-17degC inside my 1936-built apartment with its ill-fitting, thin-paned sash windows. I’ve put weather-stripping everywhere I could and stuffed rolled-up towels along the tops of the bottom sashes, which helps with the drafts but not the slow, insidious seeping-in of the cold.

Here, though, is the latest weapon in my war to keep warm indoors during winter: bubble wrap on the windows! The air bubbles act like insulation. All you do is spray water on the window and press the wrap on, bubbles facing the window. Amazingly, it seems to stay in place. You can’t see anything, of course, which could be a drawback.

And I do think those bubbles look rather blobby!

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Washing Lines 1: at sea

Hanging up the washing, Indian Ocean, somewhere between Durban and Mauritius.

On a long sailing voyage (this one was about five weeks long, from South Africa to India), clothes washing day for your group is keenly anticipated. You can hand-wash socks and, ahem, unmentionables, and drape them around the accommodation area to dry (such as my socks, in the feature photo) — but that can’t match clothes run through the washing machine and hung outside to dry in the sun and the clean fresh sea air.

Monday Washing Lines I’ve been seeing other bloggers’ posts for this challenge, but I thought I didn’t have any photos of drying laundry. Wrong!


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Sextets of pelicans

Six pelicans

It may be hard (impossible?) to tell, but the six Australian Pelicans above are not the same six as in the feature photo. I photographed these birds on 3 April at The Entrance, which is on the Central Coast north of Sydney.

One Word Sunday: Six

And, this fits very neatly into “Birds seen in the past two weeks

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Not happy with heights?

Lord Nelson

Looking up, Lord Nelson

Very few people react with glee to the idea of climbing up the mast on a tall ship. I certainly never did! Looking at these photos, it seems like a mad thing to do.

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Tenacious: look at all those narrow, wobbly ladders to climb …

In the photo below, you don’t get a sense of the height but you do get a sense of the scale.

Tenacious, with a person for scale

Not happy with heights? Nah! These crew members going aloft on Tenacious have already had four weeks to get used to it, sailing from Bermuda to Southampton.

Going aloft to harbour stow the sails! (tip: don’t look down)

Posted for One Word Sunday: Vertiginous


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Tied up

The grand old lady QE2 tied up in Zeebrugge

Among the many uses for the verb “tie up” I’m going with the nautical interpretation: to tie a boat to something with a rope, chain etc (synonym: moor). (Although I do keep thinking of the title of the 1989 Pedro Almodóvar film “Tie Me Up! Tie Me Down!” — but I have no photos for that!)

Lord Nelson’s mooring lines around a bollard, keeping the ship tied up in Galle, Sri Lanka

This is what happens when a number of ships have tied up together — and one wants to leave (us, in this case). (Galle, Sri Lanka)

Do you think this dockworker in Mauritius is pondering the accomplished way we tied up Lord Nelson?

Queen Mary 2, tied up in Sydney. This is the only cruise ship that ties up here ‘stern first’ so that its bow sticks out into the harbour.

Tenacious, tied up in Sydney (with the hideous “blot on the landscape” towers of Barangaroo behind)

Tenacious tied up in Fiji.

Voyager of the Seas, tied up in Sydney.

Posted for Becky’s SquareUp challenge. I’ve gone with “playing around with the word up”.

As always, a big thanks to Becky for organising all this square madness!


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