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Parking Lot

Parked golf buggies, Hamilton Island

Parked golf buggies, Hamilton Island

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The Pathfinder

The Pathfinder by John Robinson

The Pathfinder by John Robinson (aka The Hammer Thrower)

This is absolutely one of my most favourite sculptures. You can find it Queen Victoria Gardens, Melbourne. By John Edward Robinson, it’s a sculpture in bronze and dates to 1974. As you can see in the image above, the entire sculpture is balanced on just one foot, which I think is extraordinary. An incredible display of the understanding of physics and gravity — plus, the sculpture is so alive and so vivid, you expect him to move, to complete that throw. More about the sculpture and the artist here.

The Pathfinder by John Robinson

The Pathfinder by John Robinson (aka The Hammer Thrower)

Posted as part of Sculpture Saturday. Check it out: “This challenge is all about photographing art whether it be in a museum or out on the street. Another interpretation is things be they natural or manmade that resemble sculpture when photographed.”

(And if you’ve wondered about my blogging silence, August has been a busy month for me, as I’ve moved house and had a wretched “lurgy”, so have been rather self-absorbed!)

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Got them ol’ Whitsunday Blues

Qantas red and Whitsunday blues

“Blues” in two senses of the word: the colour, and the melancholy. Back in Sydney now, and although we have a cloudless sky and a sparkling ocean, it’s not the same. The spectre of work tomorrow hangs heavy — and my view can never match this.

Catseye beach, Hamilton Island

Sailboats, Catseye beach

The theme for July Squares is Blue.

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Prelude to a sundowner

Tide’s out, drink’s up

Do you know the term ‘sundowner’? There is a plethora of definitions, including a transient worker, a type of apple, and someone who has sundowning (a symptom of Alzheimer’s disease and other forms of dementia). I’m referring to the much more pleasant meaning of “an alcoholic drink taken at sunset”. This is more very late afternoon than actual sunset — a pre-sundowner, if you will. The photo was taken at Ettalong, a small waterside community north of Sydney where I tend to go for a weekend each April to savour summer’s last gasp. I love sitting at this waterside bar/restaurant, watching the tide and the birds and the people on the sands. Autumn hasn’t gripped us yet, but I do fear summer is on the way out — and I’ve already booked my holiday apartment for April.

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Around the bend

The Ghan at Manguri, South Australia

The Ghan at Manguri, South Australia

If you ride The Ghan the 2,977km (1,850 miles) from Darwin to Adelaide, as a friend and I did in August 2016, you will stop at Manguri in South Australia. There is nothing in Manguri. There isn’t even a train station. This enormous train, which on average is 774m (2,540ft) long but can be up to 1,096m (3,595ft), slowly — very slowly — sighs to a halt in the desert. Manguri is, however, the gateway to Coober Pedy, aka the opal capital of the world. And when passengers return from touring the mines, the underground houses, the underground church, and the desert golf course, they gather beside the train for drinks and nibbles as the sun sets (feature photo at top). Quite marvellous.

This stop also gives an unprecedented opportunity to get up close to the train without stations or fences or people getting in the way, although a rather belligerent guard did prevent me from walking across the track to take a photo that included the entire train stretching away into the distance around the bend. (It’s the middle of a desert, I hardly think that another train would have taken me unawares!!) So although The Ghan’s vanishing point is not quite as impressive as it should be, the train itself most assuredly is.

The Ghan at Manguri, South Australia

The Ghan at Manguri, South Australia