Image

Last on the Card April 2021

Both photos were taken at sunset on 30 April in Ettalong, NSW. Thousands of rainbow lorikeets wheeled and swirled and chased each other in huge flocks above the town as the sun set. If you’ve never heard even one rainbow lorikeet at full voice, you’ll struggle to imagine just how ear-splitting and deafening the birds’ noise was!

Canon Powershot SX260: I use this camera when I can’t be bothered with the weight and bulk of my ‘real’ camera.

Huawei MYA-L02: my phone takes rubbish photos and I generally only use the camera for taking a photo to send to someone at the moment — but I like how here it caught a recognisable parrot shape.

I haven’t entered Bushboy’s Last on the Card challenge before, partly because I generally wipe the card — and partly because I never post unedited photos! But I like the symmetry of these two.

Also linking to Bird Weekly – Birds in Flight

Image

Prelude to a sundowner

Tide’s out, drink’s up

Do you know the term ‘sundowner’? There is a plethora of definitions, including a transient worker, a type of apple, and someone who has sundowning (a symptom of Alzheimer’s disease and other forms of dementia). I’m referring to the much more pleasant meaning of “an alcoholic drink taken at sunset”. This is more very late afternoon than actual sunset — a pre-sundowner, if you will. The photo was taken at Ettalong, a small waterside community north of Sydney where I tend to go for a weekend each April to savour summer’s last gasp. I love sitting at this waterside bar/restaurant, watching the tide and the birds and the people on the sands. Autumn hasn’t gripped us yet, but I do fear summer is on the way out — and I’ve already booked my holiday apartment for April.

Image

Random Fridays: I’m glad they’re small!

These blue crabs look pretty scary, but they’re only about the size of the end of my finger. I didn’t even spot them initially while walking along mud flats at Ettalong at low tide — it was the plop-plop-plop of millions of tiny feet that caught my attention. The more I looked, the more I was astonished. There were hundreds of thousands of these things! For those of you of a scientific bent, they are Mictyris longicarpus (light-blue soldier crab) I think.

As the heading says, I’m glad they are small. And not looking for a fight!

The next two shots give an idea of the numbers. Prolific? Oh yes!


random-fridays-logo-2