Image

The Top End

The red outline shows roughly the area referred to as The Top End. (Google Maps)

In 2015 I did a marvellous tour of the area of Australia known as The Top End, starting and ending in Darwin. Here, in no particular order, are a few photos I like from that trip.

Pine Creek is about 225km (140 miles) from Darwin. Sadly, we did not stop for one of these icy cold beers.

Old ticket sales window at the Pine Creek Railway Museum.

Edith Falls: anyone for swimming?

This is Cahills Crossing, a road link to Arnhem Land. Those aren’t logs and twigs in the river to the right of the cars; they’re crocodiles.

No contest. You win.

Katherine Gorge, stunningly beautiful.

Termite mounds near Litchfield.

Kites at Wangi Falls. (Did you spot the one looming up from below?)

Wine and nibbles near Leichardts Point, a very civilised ending to a day of touring.

Becky is back with her squares, and for April the theme is “top“.

Image

You’ve been framed!

I haven’t had time this month to take new photos for Jude’s challenge, so I’ve turned to the archives for this selection that illustrate the use of man-made frames in composition.


About the feature photo, above: This is horizontal because I wanted to capture the symmetry of the alcoves with their matching lamps at right and left. The diminishing horizontal/vertical beams frame the garden at the end. This is the Reef House Hotel, Palm Cove, QLD, Australia.


Below is one of my favourite framed photos. Jude says “portrait-shaped pictures (vertical orientation) tend to relate to foreground and background subject elements” although here I’ve gone for a landscape orientation in order to include more of the metal arch. Nonetheless, I believe the viewer’s eye is drawn from foreground to background as the buildings get smaller with distance. I like how the point of the arch complements the point of the tower it frames.

Manhattan, looking south from the top of the Rockefeller Centre


This more traditional portrait orientation slowly leads you from foreground to background, aided by the contrast of darker, shadowed foreground with bright background. The eye is pulled through the rectangular foreground opening, through the invitingly open gate in the middle ground, and into the background courtyard with its host of intriguing objects.

A courtyard in New Orleans


Here, the blurred foreground serves only to frame the circle through which the subject of the photo is viewed. From what I recall, a vertical orientation wouldn’t have worked because above and below that metal plate were distracting elements that would have drawn attention from the locomotive.

A locomotive at the Pine Creek Railway Museum, NT, Australia


The symmetry of the architecture and the line of hanging lights, diminishing in size with distance, are framed by a single arch, starkly white against the rich red wall. A vertical line runs through the point of the arch and the line of the lights, drawing your eye to the far end of the corridor. I think this vertical composition helps to emphasise the length of the corridor.

A corridor in the St. Pancras Renaissance Hotel, London.

Posted as part of Jude’s 2020 Photo Challenge with the subject of Framing

Image

Trains and Tracks

Pine Creek Railway Museum, Northern Territory, Australia

Pine Creek Railway Museum

Disused tracks, Pine Creek Railway Museum. You can make out the name “H Pooley & Son, Liverpool, London”

I have two sets of railway-related photos for Cee’s Fun Foto Challenge with this week’s theme of trains and tracks. The first is from Pine Creek in northern Australia, where enthusiasts and volunteers maintain a small museum dedicated to the area’s railway history.

Locomotive at Pine Creek Railway Museum

Locomotive at Pine Creek Railway Museum

The narrow-gauge North Australia Railway ran south from Darwin and reached Pine Creek in 1888. By 1929 it had reached its farthest point, Birdum, a distance of some 509 km (316 miles). The line’s busiest period was during World War II.

The locomotive was built in 1877 in England, and rebuilt in 2001 in Australia.

This locomotive was built in 1877 in England, and rebuilt in 2001 in Australia.

The line closed on 30 June 1976, overshadowed by more effective means of transport, but in its time was important carrier of goods and people.

Luxurious travel in its day, but uncomfortable by our standards!

Luxurious travel in its day, but uncomfortable by our standards!

The Grand Canyon Railway, Arizona, US

The Grand Canyon Railway

The Grand Canyon Railway

The first train to carry passengers the 103 km (64 miles) from Williams, Arizona to the south rim of the Grand Canyon ran on 17 September 1901.

Old locomotive, Grand Canyon Railway

Old steam locomotive, Grand Canyon Railway

As with the North Australia Railway, competition from cars led to closure of the Grand Canyon Railway in July 1968 (only three passengers were on the last run!). Three unsuccessful attempts were made to resurrect the line, until in 1989 services resumed under different ownership.

Current locomotive, Grand Canyon Railway

Current diesel locomotive, Grand Canyon Railway. It may be more efficient and more environmentally friendly, but it doesn’t captivate people like the steam locos do!

The train today offers seating in various classes, from all-inclusive food and drink luxury carriages to high-domed viewing carriages to straightforward seating.

Going around a corner, shot from the platform at the end of the train

Going around a corner, shot from the platform at the end of the train

At the end of the train is an open platform that offers uninterrupted views back at the tracks, or forward if you lean around the corner of the carriage.

Looking back at the tracks from the platform.

Looking back at the tracks from the platform.

I think you can guess which class of seat I opted for. 😉

Access to the rear platform is through this door.

Access to the rear platform is through this door.

Time to relax, enjoy the scenery and decide which beverage to have.

Time to relax, enjoy the scenery and decide which beverage to have.

(Information about these reailways was taken from Wikipedia)


Can-US-badge