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River of blue light

Light rods snaking into the distance, The Royal Botanic Garden Sydney

Light rods snaking into the distance, The Royal Botanic Garden Sydney

Still with the Vivid light festival for this photo, but now in the Royal Botanic Garden rather than Taronga Zoo.

The theme for July Squares is Blue.

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Botanical Sun Dial

Royal Botanic Gardens sundial, Sydney

The sundial in the Royal Botanic Gardens, Sydney, dates to 1993, so it’s not as old as it looks. Allowing for us being on summer time now (requiring the addition of an hour), the sundial’s time matched that on my phone. Simple, but amazing!

Royal Botanic Gardens sundial, Sydney

December Squares #timesquare

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Tomato Festival

A celebration of tomatoes.

A celebration of tomatoes.

In February, a friend and I went to the Tomato Festival at the Royal Botanic Gardens in Sydney. There were tomatoes to taste, tomatoes to eat, tomatoes to drink, cooking and canning classes, a food market — a veritable celebration of tomatoes! And there were many more people than I expected for such a quirky event.

There was tomato artwork in the form of a mandala (a circular figure representing the universe in Hindu and Buddhist symbolism), albeit with non-tomato elements.

Mandala made with tomatoes and friends.

Mandala made with tomatoes and friends.

 

I arrived before my friend, and indulged in something sweet while waiting.

Time to taste!

Tomato Festival tasting. Grab your toothpick and get stuck in!

We both agreed that this was our favourite:

Brown Berry


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Fountains: Sydney Whatever – Sensory Fountain

Sensory Fountain  Royal Botanic Gardens Sydney

When wet, this spherical fountain is as reflective as glass.

I’ve always loved this spherical fountain in Sydney’s Royal Botanic Gardens, but had no idea it was known as the Sensory Fountain until I looked it up online for this post.

Sensory Fountain  Royal Botanic Gardens Sydney

The whole fountain, sheeted with water and as reflective as a mirror ball. I’m the small spec in the middle, between two white shrubs.

“A spherical fountain designed to be touched, seen and heard — water begins to flow as you approach. Designed for the Herb Garden in 1994 by Victorian artist Tim Jones and made by Dave Mune at the Art Foundry in Victoria. The fountain is surrounded by a bronze ring of herbs drawn by Gardens’ illustrator Marion Westmacott. Donated by the Australian Bank Ltd to commemorate their 10th anniversary and the 175th anniversary of the Royal Botanic Gardens.” source

Sensory Fountain  Royal Botanic Gardens Sydney

The water has just begun to burble from the top and is flowing along the sphere.

November’s fountain challenge theme is Typical for your Region, but I’ve morphed it into a joint effort with December’s theme of Whatever and am going with Sydney Whatever for two months.


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Fountain Series: Stately – The Governor Phillip Fountain

The Governor Phillip Fountain, Royal Botanic Gardens, Sydney

The Governor Phillip Fountain, Royal Botanic Gardens, Sydney

A fountain such as this one is a big, bold public statement, but at its heart it’s all about the water — and if you click here you’ll see a much larger version of the header image in which the spouting water has been frozen for an instance of time, bright and glittering like misshapen droplets of glass caught in a spotlight.

Jim from Sydney – City and Surrounds has already described the fountain perfectly, so I hope he doesn’t mind if I quote him: “The Governor Phillip Fountain is located in the Royal Botanic Gardens, close to Macquarie Street. It was created by the Italian sculptor Achille Simonetti and unveiled in 1897 to honour Captain Arthur Phillip, the first Governor of New South Wales. This magnificent 15.24 metre high fountain features a marble pedestal for the 4.5 metre bronze statue of Captain Phillip. The pedestal features three reliefs of Justice, Patriotism and Education. Below the pedestal are the reclining bronze figures of Neptune (Navigation), Agriculture, Cyclops (Mining) and Commerce. The four marble consoles are embellished with bronze plaques of Aboriginal people. Between the figures are four giant marble clam shells each surmounted by bronze prows of ships and twin giant sea serpents which feed water into the white marble basins.”

Sea serpents on the Governor Phillip Fountain, Royal Botanic Gardens, Sydney

Sea serpents on the Governor Phillip Fountain, Royal Botanic Gardens, Sydney

As much as I love those sea serpents, I would really prefer not to encounter one in real life!

October’s fountain theme is Stately.


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