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The ‘top’ sails

Looking at the main mast on tall ship Tenacious

I’ve put top in quote marks in the title because, as you can see, these three sails that are set are not actually at the top of anything. However, they do have ‘top’ in their name!

There are five sails on Tenacious’s main mast. Starting from the, ahem, top of the mast, we have the royal (furled); the topgallant (t’gallant, or even t’gan’sl if you want to say “topgallant sail”); the upper topsail; the lower topsail; the course (furled).

Becky is back with her squares, and for April the theme is “top“.

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Rough | Smooth

Smooth hard hat and rough rock — Coober Pedy opal mine visited from The Ghan train.

Here’s a selection of photos that contrast rough and smooth textures for Jude’s 2020 Challenge.

Samples of rock, rough on the right and polished smooth on the left — Grand Canyon.

Smooth violin (fiddle) and rough seat fabric — Grand Canyon train.

Smooth glass beads and rough sequins — New Orleans Lafeyette Cemetery.

Rough mooring lines and smooth metal winch — tall ship Tenacious.

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Buntlines

main course buntlines (starboard) (plus, at left, the fore royal brace and the fore t’gallant brace) — ‘Tenacious’, in a bit of a storm, Atlantic Ocean

Here are some ‘lines’ I’ll bet none of you have heard of! On a ship, ropes are known as lines. The ‘bunt is the middle part of a sail. I’ve hauled on buntlines more times than I can remember, but I can’t explain what they do as well as wikipedia : “buntlines are small lines fastened to the bottom of the sails, in the middle part of the bolt rope, to the cringle; and so are passed through a small block, seized to the yard. Their use is to trice up the bunt of the sail, to better furl it up”. So, all clear?

fore course buntlines (port) – ‘Lord Nelson’, New Zealand

You can expect to see more nautical-themed lines as the month goes on.

Posted as part of October Squares Lines&Squares

Man climbing the rigging with bagpipes
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Climbing the rigging

Crew climbing the rigging on 'Tenacious', 2006

Crew climbing the rigging on ‘Tenacious’, 2006

Three photos on the theme of Climb. If you’re wondering what’s poking from the bag in the feature photo, it’s bagpipes; don’t ask.

Me climbing the rigging on 'Lord Nelson', 1994

A rare shot of me going aloft! (Safely in port, you’ll notice.) ‘Lord Nelson’, 1994

Crew climbing the rigging on 'Lord Nelson', 1995

Climbing the rigging is hard enough in normal conditions — in unwieldy oilskins and wellies, it’s a real challenge! ‘Lord Nelson’, 1995


sailing-badge

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The last spike is a bristle

This is one of the many bristly brushes used over the decades (quite a few by me!) to scrub the wooden decks on the tall ships Tenacious (seen here) and Lord Nelson (there’s a photo of ‘Nellie’ in the gallery below).

sailing-badge


March’s square theme is Spiky Squares (spiky, jagged, pointy, bristly, serrated, prickly, spiny, and/or barbed). As always with a Square challenge, thanks are due to Becky for hosting and keeping us all in touch.
Here’s a round-up (square-up?) of my offerings for the past month: