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Lines of Latitude and Longitude

These two nautical charts show different parts of the Fijian islands. Above, in addition to the lines of latitude and longitude on the chart, you can see the line of the path ‘Tenacious’ took through the area.

Posted as part of October Squares Lines&Squares

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Buntlines

main course buntlines (starboard) (plus, at left, the fore royal brace and the fore t’gallant brace) — ‘Tenacious’, in a bit of a storm, Atlantic Ocean

Here are some ‘lines’ I’ll bet none of you have heard of! On a ship, ropes are known as lines. The ‘bunt is the middle part of a sail. I’ve hauled on buntlines more times than I can remember, but I can’t explain what they do as well as wikipedia : “buntlines are small lines fastened to the bottom of the sails, in the middle part of the bolt rope, to the cringle; and so are passed through a small block, seized to the yard. Their use is to trice up the bunt of the sail, to better furl it up”. So, all clear?

fore course buntlines (port) – ‘Lord Nelson’, New Zealand

You can expect to see more nautical-themed lines as the month goes on.

Posted as part of October Squares Lines&Squares

Man climbing the rigging with bagpipes
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Climbing the rigging

Crew climbing the rigging on 'Tenacious', 2006

Crew climbing the rigging on ‘Tenacious’, 2006

Three photos on the theme of Climb. If you’re wondering what’s poking from the bag in the feature photo, it’s bagpipes; don’t ask.

Me climbing the rigging on 'Lord Nelson', 1994

A rare shot of me going aloft! (Safely in port, you’ll notice.) ‘Lord Nelson’, 1994

Crew climbing the rigging on 'Lord Nelson', 1995

Climbing the rigging is hard enough in normal conditions — in unwieldy oilskins and wellies, it’s a real challenge! ‘Lord Nelson’, 1995


sailing-badge

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The last spike is a bristle

This is one of the many bristly brushes used over the decades (quite a few by me!) to scrub the wooden decks on the tall ships Tenacious (seen here) and Lord Nelson (there’s a photo of ‘Nellie’ in the gallery below).

sailing-badge


March’s square theme is Spiky Squares (spiky, jagged, pointy, bristly, serrated, prickly, spiny, and/or barbed). As always with a Square challenge, thanks are due to Becky for hosting and keeping us all in touch.
Here’s a round-up (square-up?) of my offerings for the past month:

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Turn the glass and strike the bell

Compass and bell, SV Tenacious

Compass and bell, SV Tenacious

Before the advent of accurate time pieces, time on a ship was regulated by the bell and a system of watches lasting either four or two hours. When the sand had run through a 30-minute “hour glass”, the glass was turned to start again and the bell was struck. In a four-hour watch, the bell would be struck from one to eight times, an increase of one strike every 30 minutes and performed in sets of two. So, for example, if you heard two sets of quick strikes followed by a single strike, you would know it was “five bells” in whatever the watch was (forenoon, morning, etc). Of course, this entire timekeeping process depended on an accurate glass and attention to detail!

The bell in this photo is from SV Tenacious, on which I’ve sailed many times. You can see the intricate rope pull hanging from the bell. The original captain liked to have the bell rung and it was the watch leader’s responsibility to see that it was done. I would start checking my watch every 15 seconds or so from five minutes before the time, mentally going over the number of strikes required. Once I forgot, and gradually was aware that the captain was quietly standing at the corner of the chart house, just gazing at me. Oh dear!

December Squares #timesquare