Image

The light through the window

Two photos of the Orangery, Kew Gardens, London. (The statue was no longer there in 2018; it had been against the end wall.)

This selection of photos features light streaming through a window into a room. Although these photos have very different subjects, they are all lit by windows — dramatically, softly, harshly, boldly. In some, you can see the shadows of the window frames or of the glass itself.

Two from Fiji below. On the left, the window is not visible but its bright light is falling on the boy. On the right, the diffuse light from the window highlights the flat surfaces of the wooden pews.

Two from Kerala, India. Men were making lime by burning sea shells.

This one shows the splashes of colour from light falling through a stained glass window.

New College, Oxford.

Many lines in this photo — the corrugated ceiling, the wooden floor, the supporting beams, and the multi-paned window that casts its slanting shadows.

Interior of disused industrial building, Cockatoo Island, Sydney.

The bright light brings out the colours of this woven bag and throws shadows from the edges of the glass louvres.

Bag hanging on wall, and shadows of glass louvres, Vanuatu.

No true windows in the photo below, more like openings in the stone walls. An interesting lighting effect, though!

Vomitorium of the Roman Theatre in Cadiz.

Posted for Jude’s 2020 Challenge (Light: Experiment in different weather conditions such as mist or rain, OR take a photograph indoors such as a still life or light entering a room streaming through a window OR experiment in capturing the colour of light.)

Aside

The coveted Bondi Beach view — if you don’t have it, fake it!

The “view” from my bathroom. The sun always shines, and it’s always summer on Bondi Beach.

I live in an apartment building on Campbell Parade, the street that curves along Sydney’s famous Bondi Beach. Any dwelling along the road that has a beach view is prime property indeed! I, however, live at the back of my building — much quieter, and with sweeping “district views”. One wall in my bathroom does face the beach, though it does not have a window (just as well, really, because on the other side of that wall is the foyer/lobby area for my floor!).

So I gave myself a view. I took a photo of the beach, slipped it behind a graphic of a window frame (complete with pot plant on the window ledge) and had it printed as a large poster. Then I put it on the wall, and for the finishing touch added real curtains.

Hey presto! I too now have the coveted Bondi Beach view.

(btw, the peach-painted wall is the landlord’s idea, not mine!)


The view from the window

Framed

I like the way a window’s frame lends mystery to an image: this is what you see, no more. The frame is a boundary beyond which lies the unknown, or at least the unseen. These are my entries for the Weekly Photo Challenge: Window.

Key window, Chinese Garden, Sydney.

Key window, Chinese Garden, Sydney.

One open shutter, Tordi Gar, India.

One open shutter, Tordi Gar, India.

Near Stratford on Avon.

Near Stratford on Avon.

Through a porthole, Galapagos Islands.

Through a porthole, Galapagos Islands.

Santa Catalina convent, Aerquipa, Peru.

Santa Catalina convent, Aerquipa, Peru.

A champagne winery near Reims, France.

A champagne winery near Reims, France.

Me watching the setting sun colour the Opera House, Sydney.

Me watching the setting sun colour the Opera House, Sydney.